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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1376151, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1376151
Review Article

Skeletal Muscle Cell Induction from Pluripotent Stem Cells

1Stem Cell Institute, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2Paul and Sheila Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
3Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Atsushi Asakura

Received 15 January 2017; Accepted 28 March 2017; Published 26 April 2017

Academic Editor: Silvia Brunelli

Copyright © 2017 Yusaku Kodaka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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