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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 1610691, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1610691
Review Article

Regulation of Stem Cell Properties of Müller Glia by JAK/STAT and MAPK Signaling in the Mammalian Retina

1Department of Basic Sciences, College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA
2Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Deborah C. Otteson; ude.hu.lartnec@nosettod

Received 4 November 2016; Accepted 21 December 2016; Published 17 January 2017

Academic Editor: Chuanwei Yang

Copyright © 2017 Krista M. Beach et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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