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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4979474, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4979474
Research Article

The Leukemic Stem Cell Niche: Adaptation to “Hypoxia” versus Oncogene Addiction

1Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
2Istituto Toscano Tumori, Florence, Italy
3Department of Medical Biotechnologies (Ph.D. Programme), Università degli Studi di Siena, Siena, Italy
4Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
5Institute for Research on Cancer and Ageing of Nice (IRCAN), UMR CNRS 7284-INSERM U1081, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Matteo Lulli; ti.ifinu@illul.oettam and Persio Dello Sbarba; ti.ifinu@oisrep

Received 16 February 2017; Accepted 5 April 2017; Published 4 June 2017

Academic Editor: Eftekhar Eftekharpour

Copyright © 2017 Giulia Cheloni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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