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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5091541, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5091541
Research Article

Cadherins Associate with Distinct Stem Cell-Related Transcription Factors to Coordinate the Maintenance of Stemness in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

1Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA
2College of Pharmacy, Taishan Medical University, Tai’an, Shandong, China
3Department of Breast Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Baoding, Hebei, China
4The Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Yulong Liang

Received 2 November 2016; Revised 5 January 2017; Accepted 17 January 2017; Published 14 March 2017

Academic Editor: Tong-Chuan He

Copyright © 2017 Chuanwei Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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