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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6305295, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6305295
Review Article

Focus on Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: Opportunities and Challenges in Cell-Free Therapy

1Gynecology and Oncology Department of the Second Hospital of Jilin University, Ziqiang Street 218, Changchun 130000, China
2Medical Research Center, Second Clinical College, Jilin University, Ziqiang Street 218, Changchun 130000, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Tianmin Xu

Received 11 August 2017; Revised 5 November 2017; Accepted 22 November 2017; Published 19 December 2017

Academic Editor: Changwon Park

Copyright © 2017 Lin Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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