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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7215010, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7215010
Review Article

Epigenetic Manipulation Facilitates the Generation of Skeletal Muscle Cells from Pluripotent Stem Cells

Department of Systems Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Tomohiko Akiyama and Minoru S. H. Ko

Received 17 January 2017; Accepted 27 February 2017; Published 9 April 2017

Academic Editor: Atsushi Asakura

Copyright © 2017 Tomohiko Akiyama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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