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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7316354, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7316354
Research Article

Kindlin-2 Modulates the Survival, Differentiation, and Migration of Induced Pluripotent Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

1Department of Transfusion Medicine, Cell Therapeutics and Hemostaseology, Ludwig-Maximilians University Hospital, Munich, Germany
2Translational Hepatology and Stem Cell Biology, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence and Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany
3Cell and Developmental Biology, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Münster, Germany
4Blood Transfusion Service, SRC, Zürich, Switzerland
5Blood Transfusion Service, SRC, Chur, Switzerland

Correspondence should be addressed to Reinhard Henschler; ed.xmg@relhcsnehr

Received 23 September 2016; Revised 24 November 2016; Accepted 12 December 2016; Published 9 January 2017

Academic Editor: Andrea Ballini

Copyright © 2017 Mohsen Moslem et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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