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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7602951, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7602951
Review Article

Transit-Amplifying Cells in the Fast Lane from Stem Cells towards Differentiation

EvoDevo Lab, Unidad de Sistemas Arrecifales, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Puerto Morelos, QROO, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Ernesto Maldonado

Received 14 April 2017; Revised 23 June 2017; Accepted 11 July 2017; Published 1 August 2017

Academic Editor: Veronica Ramos-Mejia

Copyright © 2017 Emma Rangel-Huerta and Ernesto Maldonado. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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