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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8154569, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8154569
Research Article

Therapeutic Potential of Multilineage-Differentiating Stress-Enduring Cells for Osteochondral Repair in a Rat Model

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Integrated Health Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, South Valley University, Qena 83523, Egypt
3Medical Center for Translational and Clinical Research, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
4Department of Stem Cell Biology and Histology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Naosuke Kamei; pj.ca.u-amihsorih@iemakhan

Received 26 January 2017; Revised 27 September 2017; Accepted 28 September 2017; Published 29 October 2017

Academic Editor: Heinrich Sauer

Copyright © 2017 Elhussein Elbadry Mahmoud et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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