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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8596135, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8596135
Research Article

The DEAD-Box RNA Helicase DDX3 Interacts with m6A RNA Demethylase ALKBH5

1CAS Key Laboratory of Innate Immunity and Chronic Disease, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Cell Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
2Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Brain Disease, Hefei, Anhui 230001, China
3Department of Neurosurgery, Anhui Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230001, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Liang Chen; nc.ude.ctsu@lcgniqna and Ge Shan; nc.ude.ctsu@egnahs

Received 16 May 2017; Revised 27 July 2017; Accepted 17 August 2017; Published 23 November 2017

Academic Editor: Yujing Li

Copyright © 2017 Abdullah Shah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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