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Stem Cells International
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 6087143, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6087143
Review Article

Epigenetic Regulations in Neural Stem Cells and Neurological Diseases

1Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China
2Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, China
3Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Medical School, Yangzhou University, Northern Jiangsu People’s Hospital, Yangzhou 225001, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xingshun Xu; nc.ude.adus@uxnuhsgnix and Yongxiang Wang; moc.361@enips819xyw

Received 4 November 2017; Accepted 8 January 2018; Published 18 March 2018

Academic Editor: Yujing Li

Copyright © 2018 Hang Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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