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Stem Cells International
Volume 2018, Article ID 7564159, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7564159
Research Article

Transplantation of Hypoxic-Preconditioned Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retards Intervertebral Disc Degeneration via Enhancing Implanted Cell Survival and Migration in Rats

1Department of Orthopaedics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003, China
2Department of Orthopaedics, Nanjing General Hospital, Nanjing 210000, China
3Trauma Center, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 201620, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiaojian Ye; nc.ude.umms@enipseyjx

Received 12 September 2017; Revised 13 November 2017; Accepted 22 November 2017; Published 14 February 2018

Academic Editor: Kivanc Atesok

Copyright © 2018 Weiheng Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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