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Stem Cells International
Volume 2018, Article ID 8631432, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8631432
Research Article

Hair Follicle Dermal Cells Support Expansion of Murine and Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Promote Haematopoiesis in Mouse Cultures

1Department of Biosciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
2Department of Dermatology, Columbia University, 1150 St Nicholas Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA
3Institute of Human Genetics, International Centre for Life, Newcastle University, Central Parkway, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 3BZ, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Colin A. B. Jahoda; ku.ca.mahrud@adohaj.niloc

Received 30 December 2017; Accepted 26 April 2018; Published 2 August 2018

Academic Editor: Shibashish Giri

Copyright © 2018 Jun Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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