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TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 11, Pages 2197-2206
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2011/634861
Research Article

Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue from Obese and Lean Adults Does Not Release Hepcidin In Vivo

1USDA Agricultural Research Service, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Knapp Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
2Oxford Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Churchill Hospital, Oxford OX3 7LJ, UK
3The Translational Research Institute for Metabolism and Diabetes 2566 Lee Rd, Winter Park, FL 32789, USA
4Intrinsic LifeSciences LLC, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
5University of Oxford and NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford OX3 7LJ, UK
6Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
7Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 W. Taylor Street, Room 650, Chicago, IL 60612, USA

Received 14 July 2011; Accepted 23 September 2011

Academic Editor: Giamila Fantuzzi

Copyright © 2011 Lisa Tussing-Humphreys et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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