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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 384912, 41 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/384912
Review Article

The Natural Science Underlying Big History

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA

Received 16 February 2014; Revised 30 April 2014; Accepted 1 May 2014; Published 17 June 2014

Academic Editor: Lukas Kratochvil

Copyright © 2014 Eric J. Chaisson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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