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Advances in Materials Science and Engineering
Volume 2016, Article ID 4863024, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4863024
Research Article

Effects of Single and Blended Coating Pigments on the Inkjet Image Quality of Dye Sublimation Transfer Printed Paper: SiO2, CaCO3, Talc, and Sericite

1Department of Environmental Engineering, Da-Yeh University, Changhua 51591, Taiwan
2Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan
3Taiwan Textile Research Institute, New Taipei City 23647, Taiwan
4Department of Forestry, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan

Received 7 May 2016; Revised 28 July 2016; Accepted 10 August 2016

Academic Editor: Massimiliano Barletta

Copyright © 2016 Chi-Ching Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the effects on the image quality of CaCO3, SiO2, talc, and sericite on coated inkjet paper. The papers serve as dye sublimation transfer paper for printing on fabrics. The brightness, smoothness, and contact angle of the coated papers were evaluated. The papers were then printed with a textile color image evaluation test form, and the imprinted images were evaluated with respect to six criteria of the solid ink density, tone value increase, print contrast, ink trapping, grayness, and hue error. The overall printed image quality was correlated with the smoothness and brightness of the coated paper but showed no correlation with the contact angle. For single-pigment-coated papers, CaCO3 produced paper with the best color difference performance and could be substituted for silica. On the other hand, SiO2 was found to be suitable for blending with talc, calcium carbonate, and sericite, and its combination with these materials generally produced better image qualities than silica alone. Talc and sericite, when blended with silica as composite coating pigments, produced better printed image qualities than those as single-pigment-coated papers. The overall image quality ranking suggests that the best performance was achieved with CaCO3-, SiO2/talc-, CaCO3/SiO2-, SiO2/sericite-, and SiO2-coated papers.