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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 565291, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/565291
Review Article

An Historical Perspective on How Advances in Microscopic Imaging Contributed to Understanding the Leishmania Spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Host-Parasite Relationship

Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia, Escola Paulista de Medicina, UNIFESP, Rua Botucatu 862, 6th Floor, 04023-062 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 3 December 2013; Accepted 10 January 2014; Published 27 April 2014

Academic Editor: Wanderley de Souza

Copyright © 2014 P. T. V. Florentino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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