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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 946867, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/946867
Research Article

3,4-Dicaffeoylquinic Acid, a Major Constituent of Brazilian Propolis, Increases TRAIL Expression and Extends the Lifetimes of Mice Infected with the Influenza A Virus

1Nagaragawa Research Center, API Co., Ltd., 692-3 Nagara, Gifu 502-0071, Japan
2United Graduate School of Drug Discovery and Medical Information Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1193, Japan
3CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan
4Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194, Japan
5First Department of Forensic Science, National Research Institute of Police Science, 6-3-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0882, Japan

Received 12 May 2011; Revised 4 July 2011; Accepted 4 July 2011

Academic Editor: Vincenzo De Feo

Copyright © 2012 Tomoaki Takemura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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