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Education Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 168741, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/168741
Review Article

Vive la Différence? Comparing “Like with Like” in Studies of Learners’ Ideas in Diverse Educational Contexts

Science Education Centre, Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 8PQ, UK

Received 31 March 2012; Accepted 9 May 2012

Academic Editor: Yi-Shun Wang

Copyright © 2012 Keith S. Taber. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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