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Education Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 902809, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/902809
Research Article

Cognitive Load of Learner Control: Extraneous or Germane Load?

1Centre for Instructional Psychology and Technology (CIP&T), KU Leuven, Dekenstraat 2, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2ITEC-IBBT-KU Leuven Kulak, E. Sabbelaan 53, 8500 Kortrijk, Belgium
3Center for Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine,Herestraat 49, Box 400, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 11 January 2013; Accepted 31 March 2013

Academic Editor: Gwo-Jen Hwang

Copyright © 2013 Mieke Vandewaetere and Geraldine Clarebout. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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