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Education Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5454031, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5454031
Research Article

Demystifying the Effect of Narrow Reading on EFL Learners’ Vocabulary Recall and Retention

1Department of ELT, Khouzestan Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz, Iran
2Department of ELT, Ahvaz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz, Iran

Received 29 April 2016; Revised 21 July 2016; Accepted 18 September 2016

Academic Editor: Jan Elen

Copyright © 2016 Marziyeh Abdollahi and Mohammad Taghi Farvardin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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