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Education Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4851067, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4851067
Research Article

Coexisting Needs: Paradoxes in Collegial Reflection—The Development of a Pragmatic Method for Reflection

Department of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, 291 88 Kristianstad, Sweden

Correspondence should be addressed to Marie Nilsson; es.rkh@nosslin.eiram

Received 6 April 2017; Revised 24 June 2017; Accepted 17 August 2017; Published 28 September 2017

Academic Editor: Angelica Moè

Copyright © 2017 Marie Nilsson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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