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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2011, Article ID 971938, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/971938
Review Article

Probiotics, Nuclear Receptor Signaling, and Anti-Inflammatory Pathways

1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Strong Memorial Hospital, University of Rochester Mediacal Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester, P.O. Box 646, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA

Received 2 February 2011; Revised 28 March 2011; Accepted 19 May 2011

Academic Editor: Genevieve B. Melton-Meaux

Copyright © 2011 Sonia S. Yoon and Jun Sun. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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