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International Journal of Food Science
Volume 2019, Article ID 2932509, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/2932509
Research Article

Characterization of Kenyan Honeys Based on Their Physicochemical Properties, Botanical and Geographical Origin

1Department of Land Resource Management and Agricultural Technology, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 29053-00625, Nairobi, Kenya
2Danish Beekeepers Association, Fulbyvej 15, Sorø, 4180, Denmark
3National Museums of Kenya, P.O. Box 40658- 00100, Nairobi, Kenya
4Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 29053-00625, Nairobi, Kenya
5Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 25, 1958 Frederiksberg. C, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Mary Wanjiru Warui; moc.oohay@iurawyram

Received 24 August 2018; Revised 29 November 2018; Accepted 16 December 2018; Published 10 January 2019

Academic Editor: Salam A. Ibrahim

Copyright © 2019 Mary Wanjiru Warui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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