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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 341820, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/341820
Research Article

Multiple Roles of Myd88 in the Immune Response to the Plague F1-V Vaccine and in Protection against an Aerosol Challenge of Yersinia pestis CO92 in Mice

1US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21703, USA
2Center of Biologics Evaluation and Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
3Institute of Medical Microbiology, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany

Received 15 February 2014; Revised 23 April 2014; Accepted 3 May 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: E. Diane Williamson

Copyright © 2014 Jennifer L. Dankmeyer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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