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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 702853, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/702853
Review Article

Homocysteine as a Risk Factor for Atherosclerosis: Is Its Conversion to S-Adenosyl-L-Homocysteine the Key to Deregulated Lipid Metabolism?

Institute of Molecular Biosciences, University of Graz, Humboldtstrasse 50/II, 8010 Graz, Austria

Received 1 March 2011; Accepted 4 June 2011

Academic Editor: George Leondaritis

Copyright © 2011 Oksana Tehlivets. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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