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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2011, Article ID 608349, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/608349
Research Article

Toxicity of Methylated Bismuth Compounds Produced by Intestinal Microorganisms to Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a Member of the Physiological Intestinal Microbiota

1Department of Microbiology I, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45141 Essen, Germany
2Department of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45141 Essen, Germany
3Department of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45141 Essen, Germany

Received 14 June 2011; Revised 24 July 2011; Accepted 26 July 2011

Academic Editor: Elke Dopp

Copyright © 2011 Beatrix Bialek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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