Material Design & Processing Communications
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Acceptance rate15%
Submission to final decision67 days
Acceptance to publication16 days
CiteScore4.400
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Impact Factor-

Simulation of the Compression Testing of Additively Manufactured Lattice Structures Using Inputs from Microcomputed Tomography

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 Journal profile

Material Design & Processing Communications seeks to spread and promote materials research advancing the understanding and applicability of novel design methodologies, production technologies, and failure prediction models technologies.

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Chief Editor, Dr Andrea Tridello, is based at Politecnico di Torino, Italy. His research interests include additive manufacturing, composite materials and fatigue behavior.

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Research Article

Experimental Investigations of Damage Identification for Aluminum Foam Sandwich Beams Using Two-Step Method

In the experiment, strain gauges and dynamic signal acquisition instruments are used to collect and record data, and the stochastic subspace algorithm is used to extract the first three strain modal parameters of each case. The damage amount identified by the second natural frequency based on the modified Timoshenko beam theory is more in line with the actual situation. The damage depth of case 2 and case 4 is 2 mm, and the identified damage amount is 10% and 9%, respectively. The damage depth of case 3 and case 5 is 4 mm, and the identified damage amount is 16% and 23%, respectively. The damage location information of case 6 is well identified by using the normalized strain modal shape difference index and the enhanced strain modal shape difference index. Taking the strain response signal of case 6 as an example, it is proved that the stochastic subspace strain modal parameter identification algorithm has strong anti-interference ability under the action of 1.5 times, 4 times, and 9 times noise. In addition, the method is verified by theoretical calculation and numerical simulation, and the damage law has a high degree of coincidence with the test. The experimental results show that this method expands the theoretical basis of foam metal damage degree information identification and improves the accuracy of damage location information identification and the anti-interference of parameter identification.

Research Article

Toughness Enhancement of PLA-Based Filaments for Material Extrusion 3D Printing

Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is one of the most popular biodegradable thermoplastics in the market of 3D printing filaments used in the material extrusion (ME) technique. This is because it can be printed easily at low temperatures. However, its inherent brittleness limits its use in many applications. In this work, the toughness of PLA filament was improved by blending with various types of rubbers including natural rubber (NR), acrylic core–shell rubber (CSR), and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) in the amount of 15% by weight. PLA/TPU filament was found to have the smoothest surface with the best shape and dimension stability, while PLA/NR filament rendered the highest tensile toughness. In term of the effect of printing temperature, the highest printing temperature in this study (210°C) provided the highest smoothness with the best shape stability and dimension accuracy. Interestingly, the tensile toughness and elongation at break of 3D printed specimens were found to be higher than those of compression-molded specimens for all filament types. This could be explained by the ability of the 3D printing technique to produce specimens that aligned in the printing direction in a fiber-like pattern.

Research Article

Investigation of the Effect of Tool Temperature on Microstructure, Hardness, and Wear Behaviour of Aluminium 6061-T6 Alloy Welded by the Friction Stir Welding Process

The friction stir welding (FSW) tool is a critical component to the success of the welding process. The aim of the paper is to investigate the effect of tool temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the aluminium alloy during the friction stir welding process. The welding experiment was conducted at a tool rotational speed of 550 rpm, and tool temperature was measured with the increment of a 60 mm distance. Three different tool temperatures were obtained, and samples were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ASTM E384 standard was followed when conducting the Vickers hardness test, and material wear behaviour was tested using the ASTM G99 tribology testing standard. The results show that the tool temperature increases with distance during the FSW process (40.5, 46, and 54°C). A high tool temperature produces the weld butt with high mechanical properties (87.5 HV). The wear rate is low at a high tool temperature ( mm3/N/m).

Research Article

Porous Titanium Scaffold: A New Design for Controlled Drug Delivery

Gelatin crosslinking using conventional methods is usually associated with some toxic side effects. In this research, therefore, the vacuum heating method at 10 Pascal and 140°C under different times of 8, 16, and 32 h was used to cross-link strontium-loaded gelatin microparticles with varying degrees obtained by the oil/water mixing method on titanium scaffolds by the dip-coating method to avoid toxicity and also to control the strontium release rate to the surrounding tissue. The possible phases formed on the surface of the porous titanium scaffolds, the gelatin microparticle distribution, gelatin strontium loading, and strontium release were characterized using thin film X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) machines, respectively. The results indicated that at 600°C, the rutile phase was formed on the surface of the heat-treated titanium scaffolds. Furthermore, strontium was successfully loaded in the spherical gelatin microparticles, and the strontium-loaded gelatin microparticles were distributed uniformly on the surface of the titanium scaffolds, while the rate of the in vitro strontium release decreased by increasing the time of the gelatin microparticle vacuum-heat crosslinking, whereas at the burst release step, the in vitro strontium release rates were around 5, 4.4, and 2.5 ppm/h, for the 8, 16, and 32 h vacuum-heat cross-linked gelatin microparticles, respectively.

Research Article

Characterization of Refractory Alloys Produced by Laser Additive Manufacturing

Refractory alloys often possess superior thermomechanical properties compared to conventional materials, such as steels, Ni-based superalloys, and Ti alloys, especially in high-temperature environments. While these materials promise to revolutionize numerous industries, significant hurdles remain for insertion into applications due to an incomplete understanding of structure-property relationships and conventional processing challenges. We explore laser-based additive manufacturing (AM) to construct refractory alloys consisting of combinations of Mo, Nb, Ta, and Ti with systematically increasing compositional complexity. Microstructure, composition, and hardness of the AM-processed alloys were characterized. Results are discussed in the context of pairing additive manufacturing with refractory metals to enable next-generation alloys.

Research Article

Investigating the Effect of Cooling Media on Hardness, Toughness, Coefficient of Friction, and Wear Rate of Mild Steel Heat Treated at Different Temperatures

Mild steel is a common material used extensively in the manufacturing industry. This manuscript investigates the effect of cooling processes on the hardness, toughness, coefficient of friction, and wear rate of mild steel heat treated at different temperatures. The material was heat treated in a furnace at two different temperatures (500 and 900°C) and cooled by water, oil, and air. Microhardness and impact tests were conducted using ASTM E384 and ASTM E23-12C. For dry conditions, the tribology ASTM G99 test standard was used to determine the coefficient of friction and wear rate per sample. The results show that mild steel heat treated at 900°C and cooled with water increased the material’s hardness by 24% and toughness by 23.3% as compared to oil- and air-cooling media. The same heating temperature and water-cooling media produce the material with a low wear rate (3.223E-008).

Material Design & Processing Communications
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate15%
Submission to final decision67 days
Acceptance to publication16 days
CiteScore4.400
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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