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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 864319, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/864319
Review Article

Pharmacogenetics of Chronic Pain and Its Treatment

Institute of Pharmacology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University Prague, Albertov 4, 12800 Prague, Czech Republic

Received 30 January 2013; Accepted 12 April 2013

Academic Editor: Metoda Lipnik-Stangelj

Copyright © 2013 Svatopluk Světlík et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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