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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 3827684, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3827684
Review Article

Fostering Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Sphingolipid Strategies to Join Forces

Department of Medical Biotechnology and Translational Medicine, LITA-Segrate, University of Milan, 20090 Milan, Italy

Received 13 August 2015; Revised 27 November 2015; Accepted 6 December 2015

Academic Editor: Alex Kleinjan

Copyright © 2016 Loubna Abdel Hadi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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