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Stem Cells International
Volume 2018, Article ID 3712083, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3712083
Review Article

Deubiquitinating Enzymes and Bone Remodeling

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Quan Yuan; nc.ude.ucs@nauqnauy

Received 29 March 2018; Accepted 29 May 2018; Published 8 July 2018

Academic Editor: Bo Yu

Copyright © 2018 Yu-chen Guo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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