Journal of Food Quality
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Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision79 days
Acceptance to publication43 days
CiteScore3.600
Impact Factor2.450

Inhibitory Effects of Myricetrin and Dihydromyricetin toward α-Glucosidase and Pancreatic Lipase with Molecular Docking Analyses and Their Interaction

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Journal of Food Quality publishes original research on issues of food quality, including the handling of food from a quality and sensory perspective and covers both medical and functional foods.

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Journal of Food Quality maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

Latest Articles

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Research Article

Identification of Secondary Metabolites in Flammulina velutipes by UPLC-Q-Exactive-Orbitrap MS

Flammulina velutipes is the fourth largest edible fungus in China with high nutritional value. In this paper, ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-Exactive-Orbitrap MS) was used to identify the secondary metabolites of F. velutipes. The metabolites were identified by comparing the retention time, accurate molecular weight, and MS2 data with standard databases of mzVault and mzCloud (compound: 17,000+) and BGI high-resolution accurate mass plant metabolome database (plant metabolite: 2500+). Finally, 26 secondary metabolites were preliminarily identified, including flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, organic acids, and steroids.

Research Article

Development of Decontamination Treatment Techniques for Dry Powder Foods by Atmospheric-Pressure Nonequilibrium DC Pulse Discharge Plasma Jet

Dry powder food ingredients imported to Japan contain large amounts of viable bacteria and coliform bacteria, and we need a simple, low-cost, dry nonthermal decontamination method without spoiling nutrients, color, fragrance, and flavor. In this study, it is shown that the decontamination performance against viable bacteria and coliform bacteria is proportional to the plasma irradiation time when OH and O3 radicals are incident on the dry powder food ingredients placed in an atmospheric-pressure nonequilibrium DC pulse discharge Ar + O2 mixture gas plasma jet. Our study revealed that there is a correlation between the plasma irradiation time and DC pulse frequency increase and the decontamination effect on the general bacterial count.

Research Article

The Effects of Mung Bean Peptide and Its’ Complexes on the Treatment of Lead Poisoning

Objective. To investigate the effects of mung bean peptide and its’ complexes on promoting lead excretion and neuroprotection of zebrafish. Methods. The lead poisoning models of zebrafish were established by lead acetate solution; the models were treated with high and low concentrations (58.3 and 175 μg/mL) of mung bean peptides, with high, medium, and low concentrations (27.8, 83.3, and 250 μg/mL) of mung bean peptide complexes, separately. The effects of the mung bean peptide complexes on the lead content, axonal fluorescence intensity, and peripheral motor nerve length changes were identified in the zebrafish model, and the effects of mung bean peptide and its’ complexes on zebrafish's lead excretion, axonal protection rate, and peripheral movement promotion rate of nerve regeneration were calculated. Results. The effects of high concentration of mung bean peptide (175 μg/mL) in promoting lead excretion was 29% (), and the effect of high concentration of mung bean peptide complexes (250 μg/mL) in promoting lead excretion was 30% (). The other concentrations of mung bean peptide and its’ complex groups did not show a noticeable lead excretion effect. The protective effects of mung bean peptide at concentrations of 58.3 and 175 μg/mL against zebrafish axonal injury were 98% and 101% (), and the peripheral nerve regeneration promotion effects were 29% () and 42% (), respectively. The protective effects of mung bean peptide complexes at concentrations of 27.8, 83.3, and 250 μg/mL against zebrafish axonal injury were 85%, 78%, and 93% (); peripheral nerve regeneration promotion rates were 46%, 50%, and 50% (). Conclusion. The mung bean peptide and its’ complexes can effectively promote the discharge of lead in the zebrafish lead poisoning and have protective and regeneration effects on zebrafish nerves.

Research Article

Comparison of Chemical Composition and Fatty Acid Profile of Traditional Meat Products from Croatia and Montenegro

The aim of this study was to compare chemical composition and fatty acid profile of Croatian and Montenegrin dry-cured meat products and dry-fermented sausages produced using a similar technology. Five types of products (n = 60) from both countries, i.e., prosciutto, sausages, pancetta, dry sirloin, and dry rack, were analysed. Basic chemical compositions and fatty acid methyl esters were determined using the accredited ISO methods. The obtained results showed no significant differences between Croatian and Montenegrin meat products in most of their chemical components, except for pancetta, in which significant differences in moisture ( = 0.007), fat ( = 0.016), and sugar ( = 0.027) contents were established. The highest protein share, significantly differing between the countries of origin, was determined in prosciutto ( = 0.018) and dry sirloin samples ( = 0.014). As for individual fatty acids, the most represented was oleic acid (C18 : 1n − 9c, OA) in prosciutto (42.29%–42.34%), followed by palmitic (C16 : 0, PA) and stearic acid (C18 : 0, SA) in Croatian dry sirloin (27.60%) and dry rack (16.08%). The obtained monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), saturated fatty acid (SFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) shares are typical of pork meat products and were in the following decreasing order: 41.97–49.75%, 39.96–45.94%, and 7.69–14.96%, respectively. The n − 6/n − 3 ratios, which were five- to eight-fold higher than recommended, ranged from 14.82 (pancetta, Montenegro) to 25.83 (pancetta, Croatia) with differences between the countries of origin seen only in pancetta samples ( < 0.001). Lipid quality indices (PUFA/SFA ratios), spanned from 0.17 (dry sirloin, Croatia) to 0.38 (pancetta, Montenegro), were also not in accordance with health recommendations. Since Montenegrin traditional meat products are unexplored yet, the obtained results could facilitate the procedure of their designation of origin and consequently contribute to their valorisation and recognisability in the international market.

Research Article

Sensory and Physicochemical Properties and Stability of Folic Acid in a Pineapple Ready-to-Serve Beverage Fortified with Encapsulated Folic Acid

Fortification of food and beverages with folic acid is carried out frequently as a remedy to folic acid deficiency which causes serious health issues. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of incorporation of folic acid encapsulated alginate submicron particles in pineapple ready-to-serve (RTS) beverages. The encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity of the particles were 91.54 ± 0.45% and 1.02 ± 0.01%, respectively. The photostability and thermal stability studies of folic acid revealed that encapsulation poses a protective effect on folic acid and that dark and refrigerated conditions contribute to higher stability of folic acid. In this study, sensory evaluation of the RTS beverages was carried out through both ranking tests and acceptance tests using a five-point hedonic scale. The sensory panel showed the highest preference to pineapple RTS with incorporated encapsulated folic acid at a quantity of its recommended daily intake (400 µg/200 mL) before heat treatment. Shelf-life evaluations were carried out through measuring physicochemical properties, and pH, titratable acidity, and total soluble solids showed negligible or acceptable changes over two months. Folic acid degradation occurred due to heat treatment, but encapsulation in alginate submicron particles provided heat stability to folic acid. Thus, microencapsulated folic acid may be a successful carrier of folic acid which can be incorporated in beverages such as fortified pineapple RTS.

Research Article

Effects of Fruit Maturity Stages on GC-FID Fatty Acid Profiles, Phenolic Contents, and Biological Activities of Eucalyptus marginata L.

The objective of this study was to determine the impact of development stages of Eucalyptus marginata’s fruits on the fatty acid composition as well as on phenolic, flavonoid, and tannin contents of oils. Taking into account fruit maturity stages, vegetable oils have been evaluated for their biological potentials. Fatty acid profiles were quantified using gas chromatography (GC) coupled to a flame ionization detector (FID). The fatty acid profiles of oils obtained from mature fruits showed highest linoleic acid content (49.21%) and Z-vaccenic (C18:1n-7) + oleic (C18:1n-9) acids (22.40%) and a low content of linolenic acid (C18:3) (1.59%). On the other hand, the major saturated fatty acid compound found in the oil of immature Eucalyptus marginata fruits was palmitic acid (C16:0) with about 27%. Based on the Folin–Ciocalteau method, the obtained results revealed a significant difference in the contents of total polyphenols, flavonoids, and tannins according to the stage of fruit maturity (). Furthermore, the detected antimicrobial potentials were related to the fruit maturity stage. While both veg\etable oils extracted from mature and immature Eucalyptus marginata fruits exhibited notable antibacterial activities against the species Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Serratia marcescens, and Escherichia coli, only the oils extracted from immature fruits exhibited an antifungal activity against Candida parapsilosis.

Journal of Food Quality
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision79 days
Acceptance to publication43 days
CiteScore3.600
Impact Factor2.450
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.