Journal of Food Quality

Preharvest and Postharvest Factors Improving Horticultural Product Quality and Shelf-Life


Publishing date
01 Jul 2021
Status
Closed
Submission deadline
12 Mar 2021

Lead Editor

1University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy

2Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Santiago del Estero, Argentina

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Preharvest and Postharvest Factors Improving Horticultural Product Quality and Shelf-Life

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Description

Improving crop quality and shelf-life is a challenge in the context of the global horticultural food supply. Horticultural crops are an important source of carbohydrates, proteins, organic acids, vitamins, and minerals for human nutrition and health. In addition to the health benefits that can derive from their consumption, fruit and vegetable can also function as precious sources of bioactive compounds for food functionalization or nutraceutical preparations. To improve quality and reduce the losses, producers and handlers should understand the biological, environmental, and technological factors affecting quality and deterioration.

Fresh horticultural crops are living tissues subject to continuous changes after harvest; fresh horticultural crops are high in water content and, for that reason, are subject to weight loss and to mechanical injury. Horticultural commodities are perishable products with active metabolism, subjected to extensive postharvest losses through microbial decay, physical injury, and senescence during postharvest life. Postharvest changes in horticultural crops cannot be stopped, but they can be slowed within certain limits. The maintenance or improvement of the postharvest life of fresh horticultural crops is becoming increasingly important. Indeed, appropriate pre-harvest and postharvest handling and technology play a key role in increasing food availability and maintaining food quality. Fresh horticultural crops are different in terms of morphological structure (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, etc.), in composition, and in general physiology, for that reason, commodities requirements and recommendations to maintain quality and improve postharvest life vary among the products. The connection between quality build-up in the preharvest period and its impact on the technological quality traits have been frequently overlooked and detailed knowledge is still missing. Fruit and vegetable quality parameters include size, visual attractiveness (color, shape), taste, health benefits, shelf life, suitability for processing, and so on. During the production chain, specific criteria prevail depending on the product's final destination, either the fresh market or the processing industry. During the postharvest life, as maturation progresses, genetic, chemicals, and environmental control can help to maintain product quality. Improving shelf life, maintaining quality, and reducing waste while reducing the use of chemicals is mandatory to meet the consumer's demand and reduce losses along the food chain.

The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight and describe recent research regarding preharvest and postharvest factors and technologies that affect horticultural product (fresh and processed) quality and shelf-life. Original research and review articles are welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Emerging agronomic practices and technologies to enhance quality and shelf-life of fruits and vegetables
  • Emerging technologies to enhance and to check safety, health, and sustainability of fresh and minimally processed fruit and vegetables
  • Fresh and minimally processed products’ physiology and technology, and factors affecting quality changes and shelf-life
  • Fresh and minimally processed product quality evaluation
  • Controlled and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) application and composition
  • Methodologies and technologies for edible coating production and application on fresh and minimally processed products
  • Effect of harvest, handling, processing, storage, and distribution on quality, nutritional, and nutraceutical parameters
  • Factors that affect quality losses and waste in the food chain
  • Microbiological analysis of fresh and minimally processed products, and the effect of anti-microbial agents on microbial load and product safety
  • Sensory analysis and consumer acceptance of fresh and minimally processed products

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 9996073
  • - Research Article

Changes in Vegetative and Reproductive Growth and Quality Parameters of Strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa Duch.) cv. Chandler Grown at Different Substrates

Noosheen Zahid | Mehdi Maqbool | ... | Syed Zulfiqar Ali Shah
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 9921834
  • - Research Article

Preharvest Factors Affecting Quality on “Abate Fetel” Pears: Study of Superficial Scald with Multivariate Statistical Approach

Alessandro Bonora | Enrico Muzzi | ... | Luca Corelli Grappadelli
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 9976052
  • - Research Article

Effect of Opuntia ficus-indica Mucilage Edible Coating in Combination with Ascorbic Acid, on Strawberry Fruit Quality during Cold Storage

Giorgia Liguori | Raimondo Gaglio | ... | Alessandro Miceli
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 6674208
  • - Research Article

Increasing Lignification in Translucent Disorder Aril of Mangosteen Related to the ROS Defensive Function

Chalermchai Wongs-Aree | Patchayapon Siripirom | ... | Sompoch Noichinda
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 6620446
  • - Research Article

Polyphenol Content and Antioxidant Activity of Stevia and Peppermint as a Result of Organic and Conventional Fertilization

Lina Garcia-Mier | Adriana E. Meneses-Reyes | ... | Ana A. Feregrino-Perez
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2020
  • - Article ID 8888117
  • - Review Article

Mycotoxins Analysis in Cereals and Related Foodstuffs by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Techniques

Slim Smaoui | Olfa Ben Braïek | Hajer Ben Hlima
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2020
  • - Article ID 8866369
  • - Review Article

Effect of Cold Plasma on Quality Retention of Fresh-Cut Produce

Hadi Bagheri | Sepideh Abbaszadeh
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2020
  • - Article ID 8857669
  • - Research Article

Exposure to Volatile Essential Oils of Myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) Leaves for Improving the Postharvest Storability of Fresh Loquat Fruits

Nadire Pelin Bahadırlı | İbrahim Kahramanoğlu | Chunpeng Wan
Journal of Food Quality
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision79 days
Acceptance to publication43 days
CiteScore3.600
Impact Factor2.450
 Submit

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.