Table of Contents
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Volume 2016, Article ID 7120753, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7120753
Research Article

An Intrabody Drug (rAAV6-INT41) Reduces the Binding of N-Terminal Huntingtin Fragment(s) to DNA to Basal Levels in PC12 Cells and Delays Cognitive Loss in the R6/2 Animal Model

Vybion Inc., P.O. Box 4030, Ithaca, NY 14852, USA

Received 27 April 2016; Accepted 27 June 2016

Academic Editor: Nihar Ranjan Jana

Copyright © 2016 I. Alexandra Amaro and Lee A. Henderson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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